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NEW MEXICO STATE BENCH

Fed

Division

123#

132#

148#

NASA

PURE

85.0kg

87.5kg

0

NASA

NOVICE

77.5kg

0

0

NASA

OPEN

0

82.5kg

91.0

NASA

SUBMASTER 2

85.0kg

87.5

0

NASA

MASTER 1

0

92.5kg

97.50

NASA

MASTER 5 (PURE)

77.5kg

92.5

97.5

 

 

NASA AMERICAN BENCH

Fed

Division

123#

132#

148#

NASA

NOVICE

77.5kg

0

0

NASA

OPEN

0

0

91.0

NASA

SUBMASTER 2

85.0kg

0

0

NASA

MASTER 1

0

92.5kg

0

NASA

MASTER 5 (PURE)

77.5kg

92.5

0

 

 

NASA WORLD BENCH

Fed

Division

123#

132#

148#

NASA

MASTER 1

0

92.5kg

0

 

 

NASA AMERICAN PUSH/PULL

Fed

Division

123#

132#

148#

NASA

MASTER 5

0

0

187.5

 

 

AAU AMERICAN BENCH

Fed

Division

123#

132#

148#

AAU

MASTER 1

0

92.5kg

0

 

 

AAU WORLD BENCH

Fed

Division

123#

132#

148#

AAU

MASTER 1

0

92.5kg

0

 

NASA 2005 Webmaster Of The Year
NASA 2006 Webmaster Of The Year
NASA 2006 Masters 1 Female Bencher Of The Year
NASA 2007 Webmaster Of The Year

NASA 2009 Hall Of Fame

NASA 2011 Webmaster Of The Year

NASA 2011 Administrator Hall Of Fame

NASA 2012 Webmaster Of The Year

NASA 2015 Webmaster Of The Year

NASA 2016 Webmaster Of The Year

 

 

 

Lisa Siddell 08/2000

Lisa Siddell 08/2000

Lisa at Natural Nationals 2005

Lisa at Natural Nationals 2005

Lisa & Carlos Natural Nationals 2005

Team New Mexico Natural Nationals 2005


Lisa Siddell 08/00

Lisa Siddell

New Mexico State Chairperson, American Record Holder, World Record Holder, National Referee, New Mexico State Webmaster, National, State, Regional & World Cup Champion

Rio Rancho, New Mexico

I recently was given the opportunity to interview Lisa Siddell a magnificent lady! Rich told me she had a great story to share, and great it is. Powerlifting is a great sport, but it is even greater when you learn the trials that lifters have had to go through and are still on the platform setting World Records.

 How long have you been competing? My first meet was in March 1993 in Carlsbad NM

What division(s) in and weight class do you current compete?

127.8 - Pure, Natural but mostly Masters 1 and Masters 5. My upcoming meet I will be competing in the 138.8# as I am trying for the American Record in that weight class & division

 What got you started in this sport?

My husband competed years ago and wanted to get back into it. We went to a meet and I figured I could do that and it looked like fun, so I've been hooked ever since

 Why did you choose to compete with NASA?

Because it was important to me that I compete against others that are not steroid users. There is also a difference in the type of lifter that competes in NASA rather than the other federations.

 Can you describe what you felt like at your first competition?

I was scared to death. I had the shakes for a week before I even went to Carlsbad. I have always been unable to get up in front of a group of people so when I got on the platform for the first time, I was amazed that everything around me vanished. I heard nothing. I was concentrating so hard on what I was doing that I developed tunnel vision. To this day if I cannot get back into that mode, I have a lousy meet. It did help me with my ability to speak in front of a group. I am no longer as much of an introvert as I once was.

 You have had to face some major trials outside of powerlifting, would you care to tell us about those?

Boy have I. In 1995 I had a massive brain tumor removed that left the right side of my face paralyzed and destroyed my hearing on that side. Luckily it was not cancerous. I went through several surgeries to help correct the damage that the tumor had caused. I was back in the gym in 5 weeks after my brain surgery. I had the tumor removed in April and in October I set a new American Record on the bench. Then in November 1998 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Between the surgery, radiation for eight weeks and the drugs that I now take, my training has been put on the back burner as the radiation damaged my pectoral's minor and major and created a lot of scar tissue that I've had to learn to work around. I've been training for the last year but I don't recover the way I used to. Even during the radiation I still managed to get into the gym at least twice a week. The one thing I hate to hear someone say is that "I can't". Say you won't or you don't want to but never "I can't" as I believe you can do anything if you want it bad enough.

 You said you had a major brain tumor, where you competitive before they discovered the brain tumor? If so did you consider no longer competing?

Yes. I had been competing for about three years prior to the surgery. The doctors told me that because of the shape that my body was in is what helped me get through the eight and a half-hours of surgery. No I have never considered no longer competing. I have taken time off but never thought about actually quitting. I had a neurosurgeon tell me that he thought I was nuts to continue. Maybe!

 How long did it take you to get back on track with your training after the brain tumor was removed?

I was back in the gym after 5 weeks. I didn't do my first plate until about one month after that and from their muscle memory kicked in.

I admire your strength, I am not talking about just physical strength but your strength over all. What keeps you focused and inspires you to keep competing?

It's really not mental strength that I have it is stubbornness. No one is going to tell me what I can or can't do unless I decide that I can't. I stay focused by a picture that I have of myself on my refrigerator of that first meet after my brain surgery. I looked so bad and it reminds me every day of what I have to be thankful for and how far I have come since then. I am inspired by every new lifter that I meet at each competition and seeing how pumped they get. I'm inspired by anyone who has the desire to do better, to get stronger. I'm inspired every time I go to a meet and see the same faces that I saw last year and the year before. I'm inspired every time someone asks me a question and honestly values my opinion that to me is the biggest complement.

You mentioned a rotator injury…is that going to require surgery?

Not if I can help it. I used my shirt for the first time last night and my shoulder didn't hurt at all. I think it is a bad strain that will heal in time if I allow it to.

 You were diagnosed with breast cancer in 1998. I know one of the myths out there about breast cancer is "as long as you live a healthy lifestyle you are safe." That myth is obviously just that a myth because you are in wonderful shape and are a competitive athlete. Is there any advice you would like to tell our sisters in power about breast cancer?

Yes. Another myth is that mostly women get breast cancer that has it in their family. I had no breast cancer in my family and I didn't fit into any of the profiles such as high fat diet. We are all susceptible to breast cancer and it is not an old ladies disease anymore. Women are getting breast cancer at an alarming rate and younger every year. You'd be surprised to see how many women in there 20's are diagnosed with it. Don't wait until you are 40 to have a mammogram, it may save your life, it did mine.

 Would you say being in such excellent shape has helped you recover from your medical battles quicker?

Much quicker. It has also given focus to my life and I've had little time to worry about being sick.

 In an earlier conversation you mentioned that you train some people for powerlifting. Do you train a lot of people?

I'm currently working with two ladies. One is a Masters and the other is a Submaster. I think most men feel funny about having a woman train them. I think I'm a little more understanding about what a female lifters needs than a man would be.

 There are a lot of training methods out there, are there any ones you that you feel strongly about? (For or against).

Training methods are like a lot of things in life. What works for me may not work for you. We are all individual and our workouts need to be adjusted accordingly. I do believe in lifting heavy. I have to or my muscles get lazy.

 What is a day like in the life of Lisa?

Normally I have a pretty boring life and I really prefer it that way.

 How often do you train?

I try to be in the gym at least 4 days a week.

 After a competition how long before you get back in the gym?

I used to take a week off but those days are gone. I'm usually back in on Monday

 How many competitions do you do on average a year?

It has been twice but Rich has us up to 3 times a year

 What are your long-term goals in powerlifting?

As a bencher, my goal is to do this as long as possible. Short term is to bench over 200#. I can see myself with a walker shuffling up to the bench. Wonder if Rich would let me use support hose in competition?

 Who are your role models in NASA and in general?

In NASA is everyone who has to guts to get on the platform and compete. It takes something special to do that. Also all the women that compete in any capacity, whether it is 3 lift, bench or powersports. I think it is important that we are not afraid to be strong. In general, my role model is Bev Francis-I think she's great.

 Can you describe your proudest moment in NASA?

When I competed at the Novice Nationals in Vegas and took a World Record after almost dropping the weight on my head.

 What has been your biggest disappointment in powerlifting?

When I bombed in my second meet.

 What else do you think can be done to promote NASA and powerlifting?

Advertise. We have around 15 lifters in my gym alone and believe me people watch and they want to know more. We are the best advertisement that NASA could have.

 How do you suggest we get more women involved with the sport?

To stay in the public eye especially in the gym. There are so many myths about women and power that a lot of times the ladies won't ask, but a lot do. For the one's that do, there is an interest that just may spark and you need to be ready to help the fire grow

 Where do you see the sport going?

I think we have too many federations but I don't see a resolution in the near future.

 What would you like to see changed?

How the general public views us and that they make powerlifting an Olympic sport.

 General comments.

The one thing I really love about this sport is the support you get from other lifters. I've been very lucky in life, not only medically but also for the friends that I have. They have all been very supportive throughout these last few years and even when I felt like I couldn't go on my fellow lifters helped me to get to where I needed to be.

My husband and my family have also been the light in my darkness. They have always believed in me and would not let me feel self-pity. I was always afraid of disappointing them. I knew that I couldn't quit because I didn't want to. Thanks Rich for giving me this outlet that I needed and thanks Penny for allowing me to express it…¨

Lisa's husband, Carlos Siddell wrote the following article about his wife:

 

 October 30, 1995 by Carlos Siddell

Webster describes motivation as "An inner drive, impulse, etc... That causes one to act in a certain way." To be motivated, you must have incentive, goals and above all...drive.

At Cherry's Health and Fitness in Rio Rancho New Mexico, several others and I have received the most inspirational sense of motivation in the person of Lisa Siddell.

Standing only 4'11" at 37 years of age, this stronger than normal little woman has set both New Mexico State and American records in the bench press in more than one federation. This brings us to the reason why I've written this letter.

Six months ago, this remarkable person after having been sporadically ill and suffering from severe headaches fought off the pains for as long as she could. She gave into the inevitable and made an appointment with a neurologist who after an MRI discovered that Lisa was in possession of a massive acoustic neuroma involving the nerves leading to the right side of her face. This tumor measured just over 3 centimeters and had forced the brain to move over 1/2 inch. It also was against the spine threatening to end everything she had.

Without delay, the doctors immediately admitted Lisa into the hospital for emergency surgery. After the necessary people were contacted and briefed, the surgery began.

8 1/2 hours later the neurosurgeon came into the waiting room and informed me that my best friend, my work-out partner, my companion and my wife had just endured a more difficult operation than they had anticipated.

He told me that she would recover but not without losing the use of the right side of her face. This included her hearing and the control over her right eye. The shock of seeing her in her present condition chilled me to a point of tears.

All Lisa's friends from the gym visited the hospital to wish her a warm recovery. Sadly for the 1st week she could not respond.

Miraculously, she began to improve day after day, week after week and with surprisingly amazing results. Within four weeks she had returned to work and after 5 weeks against doctors orders, she returned to the gym. That first day back nobody recognized her. She had no hair remaining and an 8-inch incision to the back of her head. It was easy to see by the faces of everyone, that they were uncomfortable with her presence.

Lisa was hurt by the sense of abandonment she felt but decided to work harder than ever. Soon, everyone began to realize how truly determined and fixed she really was.

This did not come easy and again another set back insued. It was necessary for her to have surgery again, this time to correct the loss of control that her eye had developed during the operation.

The eye surgery was successful and again Lisa returned to the gym with even more drive than before. Over the past few months, Lisa hasn't slowed down in the least, working her way to new heights daily.

This month, we will be competing again and I know how important it will be for Lisa to be rewarded for her hard work, as for the rest of us we will all do well just knowing that we won't ever quit.

Lisa's never ending sense of tenacity has proven to be the key to successful motivation, for the many of us who admire her. For the lifters who have been united as a family, that train with and have the utmost admiration for her, they see her as a light. As for me...I am thankful. Not only for her life, but also for all that I have learned. I will never be as strong as I am at this moment. We must all take Lisa's example of never quitting to heart.

Carlos Siddell

Rio Rancho NM

Savage the body - Civilize the mind¨

Please remember this interview and the article the next time you face any trial in life and say "I can't".


It was with honor and pride that I was selected by Rich Peters to represent NASA at the AAU World Championships in Laughlin NV December 2003

 

 

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