NASA NEW MEXICO STATE

Teale Adelmann

 

I've always been active- I started playing softball around middle school age and played into adulthood. I was never very good at the sport, but I enjoyed the excitement of the game. During high school I enjoyed cheerleading, Jazz dancing, and gymnastics. In my senior year of high school I started going to Champions Gym in Albuquerque and became interested in bodybuilding. It turned out that I enjoy food to much to ever be a bodybuilder, so I just stuck with lifting heavy weight. I became involved in powerlifting when I started working out at Cherry's Gym in Rio Rancho. I noticed a group of guys and one really strong lady working out and she invited me to work out with them. Lisa Siddell encouraged me and in 1996 I entered a NASA powerlifting meet in Alamogordo. I was a bench only lifter until 2002 when I entered my first full powerlifting meet. Now I have been competing for 9 years and my best competition lifts are 353lb squat, 265lb bench, 355lb deadlift and a 926lb drug tested total at 121lbs bodyweight. Here are a few of my accomplishments: I am currently the top female powerlifter and the top female bencher by bodyweight in NASA. 2003 and 2005 NASA female bencher of the year 2004 NASA Sub Master Female bencher of the year 2004 NASA female referee of the year 2004 and 2005 NASA female athlete of the year January, 2004 athlete of the month- Rio Rancho, NM 2005 NAS Iron Will Strongman Challenge 2nd Place overall Aug/Sept. 2005 Issue Monster Muscle's Iron Maiden

Elaine Waugh

Name: Elaine Waugh
Weight Class: 165
Occupation: Office Manager
What lifts do you compete in? Power Sports and Squat, Push & Pull, Unequipped
When did you start competing? September, 1999
Your first meet, location and date: Rio Rancho, September, 1999
Best competition lifts: DL 230, SQ 148, BP 105, Curl 70 lbs
Best gym lifts: I don’t recall doing any of these weights in the gym
Records: (past and current) Nationals 7, World Cup 7, State 10
Gear used: 4” wide belt
Federations that you have belonged to: NASA, AAU
Scariest moment in a meet or at the gym while training: My first competition
Most memorable meet and why: World Cup – I set my DL record of 215. Mike had picked my weight and I was so pumped that on my 4th attempt I pulled a 215 without realizing it until I was off platform and Mike asked me if I knew what I had pulled and he then told me.
Why do you compete and what rewards do you receive from competing? My biggest reward is able to tell someone what I do and they look unbelievable at me and say “you do what?” I love the idea of being able to lift weights and to be able to increase those lifts. It is a challenge to continually improve. And you meet so many wonderful people, the lifters will help you in any way they can. They work together but still individually. It gives me a good feeling when you are with them. Most influential person in your powerlifting career and why? Mike Adelmann-He is a good coach and he knows the sport, he can look at you and tell you what you are doing wrong and know how to correct it, and then the next time you automatically know what you did wrong. He doesn’t have to say anything. He works with me just like anyone else in the group. I try all the exercises, he doesn’t pamper me or anyone else for that matter. He is a good friend. He is always finding new exercises for us to try. If you have a problem in a lift, he will find a way for you to improve in it.

Bill Helmich

Name: Bill Helmich
Weight Class: 220 lb, Masters 3
Occupation: Management Consultant, Training in Federal Grant and Contract Law
What lifts do you compete in? Powerlifting
When did you start competing? 2002
Your first meet, location and date: Rio Rancho, December 29, 2001
Best competition lifts: Squat – 546; Bench – 386; Deadlift - 601
Best gym lifts: Deadlift - 605
Records: (past and current): NASA records in Bench, Squat and Deadlift at above amount; IPF record in Bench at 365.
Gear used: Titan for squat and bench; Metal for deadlift
Federations that you have belonged to: NASA, AAU, USAPL, IPF
Scariest moment in a meet or at the gym while training: Passing out on Bench while doing opener at NASA Nationals in 2005.
Most memorable meet and why: IPF Worlds in India – 2004 (World Champion), IPF Worlds in South Africa – 2005 (World Champion and World Record) and NASA Nationals – 2006 – First person over 60 years old to do over 600 in deadlift in NASA.
Why do you compete and what rewards do you receive from competing? The challenge to improve and do better and the opportunity to compete against others and the camaraderie of lifting.
Most influential person in your powerlifting career and why? Mike Adelman. Coach and supporter.
General comments: Love powerlifting. Its addictive.

Name: Richard Kahle
Weight Class: Currently 275, previously 308
Occupation: Personal Trainer, Gym owner
What lifts do you compete in? Everything! Retired Olympic lifter. Occasional Strongman When did you start competing? 1993; returned to the darkside in 2001 after four year hiatus
Your first meet, location and date: NM Regionals, Winrock Inn, Albuquerque, Fall 1993
Best competition lifts: 825 Squat, 585 Bench, 700 Deadlift
Best gym lifts: 810 squat, 570 bench, 675 deadlift
Records: (past and current) 5 NASA and AAU World Records, 18 NASA and AAU American records, numerous NM state records; 8 AWA American weightlifting records, 4 NM State weightlifting records; Only NM athlete to be state champion powerlifter (NASA and USAPL), state champion weightlifter, and NM Strongest Man in the same year (2002).
Gear used: Titan everything currently, Inzer, marathon, frantz, and Crains previously
Federations that you have belonged to: NASA and USAPL currently, AAU and USPF previously
Scariest moment in a meet or at the gym while training: Blowing my suit out with 800 pounds on my back at NM Regionals 2002; second scariest, Storm dumping a bench press on her face at 2002 Nationals
Most memorable meet and why: World Cup 2003, first 500 pound bench
Why do you compete and what rewards do you receive from competing? Powerlifting is one of the few sports where there is an unquestionable measure of performance. In track and field, there is "wind aided" that can affect results. A sprint that is faster than the world record can be turned in by some guy at a small NCAA meet because the wind or the top sprinter in the world can run slower than a high schooler. In sports where there is direct competition, he could have the flu and be sick and you only win because of that. Gymnastics has subjective judging to determine the score. Team sports can have the best player in the league trapped by subpar teammates. Powerlifting is beyond that. Gravity is universally the same everywhere on the planet. The bar is the same. Everything is a level playing field. So if you hit PRs on your lifts, you are better than before. Even if the judges hate you, if you lift the bar perfectly, you still made the lift. I like the purity of our sport. I have all that I have because of this sport. My job is based on my training. I met my wife at the gym that I worked at because I needed a profession that would help me further my training. Most of my friends I know because of lifting. This sport taught me to be who and what I am today. Most influential person in your powerlifting career and why? Three people. Fred Hatfield; founded ISSA the organization I became certified through and started my career in training. He gave me advice that helped me become a better lifter both directly and indirectly; Doug Briggs, sponsored my first competition and was my Olympic lifting coach and indirectly led to my return to powerlifting; Mike Adelmann, for all he does for the sport and for all his support and guidance in my second powerlifting career.